The 10 Most Dangerous States to Drive In

Even though fatal car crashes in the United States have decreased in number, traffic collisions remain a grave problem. It’s a promising sign that there were approximately 10,000 fewer accidents in 2014 than in 2004, but 32,675 people were still killed in auto accidents.

The Most Dangerous States Based on Fatalities

Across the country, for every 100,000 individuals in 2014, we saw 10.2 deaths. Where were the most fatal collisions? The most dangerous state for drivers is Wyoming, with 25.7 deaths occurring for every 100,000 residents.

Wyoming fatality statistic

Louisiana, unfortunately, did not escape the list of top 10 most dangerous states to drive in for 2014. However, it’s our hope that the community as a whole will work to improve these numbers and our dangerous road situations in the coming years, reducing unnecessary vehicle deaths. The following are the top 10, starting with the least dangerous: Louisiana.

10. Louisiana Louisiana

Louisiana saw 15.9 road deaths per 100,000 people. It had 737 total roadway fatalities, and 51% of all fatal crashes occurred on rural roads.

9. South Dakota South Dakota

In South Dakota, 15.9 people per 100,000 died in auto accidents on the road. In 2014, this state had 136 total roadway fatalities, and 85% of fatal crashes occurred on rural roads.

8. Alabama Alabama

Alabama had 16.9 road deaths per 100,000 citizens and 820 total roadway fatalities. The state saw 66% of fatal crashes occur on rural roads.

7. South Carolina South Carolina

Coming in 7th on the most dangerous states to drive in list, South Carolina had 17.1 road deaths per 100,000 people. The total roadway fatalities for 2014 came in at 824, but 90% of individuals in the state were wearing seatbelts.

6. Oklahoma Oklahoma

Oklahoma experienced 17.3 road deaths per 100,000 people in 2014, and it had 669 total roadway fatalities. An unfortunate 90% of the drivers killed had a blood alcohol content (BAC) of equal or greater than 0.08.

5. North Dakota North Dakota

North Dakota saw 18.3 road deaths per 100,000 people. But, it had the 4th highest percentage of fatal crashes on rural roads. 33% of drivers killed on roads in this state had a BAC of equal or greater than 0.08.

4. New Mexico New Mexico

In New Mexico, 18.4 road deaths occurred for every 100.000 people. 92% of residents use seat belts in New Mexico, and 64% of fatal crashes occur on rural roads.

3. Montana Montana

Montana’s residents aren’t wearing seatbelts like they should. Only 74% of people buckle up while driving, and 18.8 road deaths occurred per 100,000 people.

2. Mississippi Mississippi

Mississippi had the 7th lowest number of citizens wearing seatbelts, coming in at just 78%. For every 100,000 people in the state, there were 20.3 deaths. In Mississippi, 91% of fatal auto crashes occurred on rural roads.

1. Wyoming Wyoming

Wyoming is the worst state on the top 10 most dangerous roads list. There, 150 fatalities happened on roadways, a high 25.7 fatalities for every 100,000 residents.

What Louisianans Should Look Out For

There’s a trend with the states listed above. All of them have high numbers of fatalities occurring on rural roads. In general, these types of highways and streets are less safe than those in highly populated areas. Looking specifically at dangerous roads in Louisiana, we have several of concern:

  • I-59
  • I-10
  • I-55
  • I-20
  • And I-90

All of these interstate roads have ranked in a list of the deadliest highways in the U.S.

We want Louisiana residents to stay safe on our roads and stay off statistics lists. While it may take some time to make that happen, choosing not to drive distracted or while under the influence is a good start, as is wearing a seat belt every time you’re in a motor vehicle.

Don’t Hesitate to Contact a Lawyer

If you’ve been the victim of the actions of someone who wasn’t driving safe, Tony Tramontana Attorney at Law wants to help. Fill out the contact form on this page to get information on how to handle a personal injury situation involving a car accident.

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